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5 Must Visit Sustainable Destinations In Japan

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5 Must Visit Sustainable Destinations In Japan

Date: Oct 23, 2021
Author: Collins.cidar 295 No Comments

Japan is the home of sustainable Eco-tourism and is the most popular in the world, with alot of destinations to promote the Sustainablilty of Eco-tourism impact. I bet you, the experience in Japan will also take you wonder by wonder . Below are place your u would like to visit in your next trip to Japan.

Nikko National Park

Nikko National Park

Nikko National Park is the one of first national parks that opened in 1934. The park area straddles Fukushima, Tochigi, and Gunma Prefectures and the total area is 114,908 ha. Most of the area is a mountainous region of the Nasu Volcanic Belt with such mountains as Mt. Shirane (2,578 m above sea level), the highest peak in the northern Kanto region; Mt. Nantai (2,486 m above sea level), which has been renowned as an object of worship from ancient times; and Mt. Nasudake (1,917 m above sea level), which is still an active volcano. These mountains have wideplateaus at their bases, and the additional beauty of lakes, reservoirs, magnificent falls, and valleys with splendid autumn leaves, all of which were created by volcanic activity. In addition, there is the beautiful fusion of a number of historic world-heritage temples and shrines and the natural scenery surrounding them. Nikko National Park boasts easy access by train or car from areas around Tokyo and is, therefore, popular as a spot where visitors can experience nature, history, and culture.

Nachi Falls

Nachi Falls

In the depths of Nachi, the flowing water flowing from the Kumotori mountain range is Otaki, and there are many waterfalls all over the mountain, which is called Nachi 48 waterfall, and the highest is Nachi Otaki. Also known as Ichitaki, the height is 133m, the width of the sword mouth is 13m, the depth of the jar is more than 10m, and the amount of water flowing down is usually about 1 ton per second. Upstream of this waterfall, there are two waterfalls and three waterfalls, which are collectively called Nachi Otaki, and are a national scenic spot. Downstream, there is Mongaku Waterfall, which is famous for waterfall training.

Water is the mother of life and is the root of the Nachiyama faith. Since ancient times, the belief in longevity and longevity has been deeply worshiped, and many waterfall practitioners and worshipers have visited the waterfall.The area around this area is a special area of ​​Yoshino Kumano National Park, and the nearby mountains are a national natural monument as Nachi Primeval Forest, and Kyoshi Takahama wrote that “God is the true waterfall of Nachi .. The fire event of the Nachi Fire Festival is held on this approach on July 14th every year.

Waterfall worship stage (Admission fee: 300 yen, elementary and junior high school students: 200 yen, preschoolers: free) A viewing stage where you can see the waterfall in front of you. You can also drink the water from the waterfall basin, which is said to be the water for longevity and longevity.

Nagano

Nagano

Nagano is located in former Shinano Province and developed from the Nara period as a temple town at the gate of the famous Zenkō-ji, a 7th-century Buddhist temple which was relocated to this location in 642 AD, and as a post station on the Hokkoku Kaidō highway connecting Edo with the Sea of Japan coast. In the southern section of Nagano City are a series of over 500 burial mounds at Ōmuro Kofun – a National historic site – dating from the 5th-8th centuries.

During the Sengoku period (c. 1467 – c. 1600), the area was hotly contested between the forces of the Uesugi clan based in Echigo Province and the Takeda clan based in Kai Province. The several Battles of Kawanakajima between Uesugi Kenshin and Takeda Shingen were fought near here. During the Edo period (1603 and 1868), much of the area came under the control of the Sanada clan based at Matsushiro Domain. The area suffered from flooding in 1742, and from a destructive earthquake in 1847.

Following the Meiji restoration and the creation of the municipalities system on April 1, 1889, the modern town of Nagano was established. Nagano was elevated to city status on April 1, 1897. During World War II, construction of the Matsushiro Underground Imperial Headquarters as the last redoubt for the Japanese government following the projected American invasion of Japan was started in 1944, but was aborted in 1945 due to the end of war. It was the first city founded in Nagano Prefecture and the 43rd city in Japan. Nagano hosted the 1998 Winter Olympics, 1998 Winter Paralympics, and the 2005 Special Olympics World Winter Games.

The Okinawa Islands

The Okinawa Islands

The Okinawa Islands are the political, cultural and population center of Okinawa Prefecture.[3] The prefectural capital of Naha is within the island group. 90% of the population of the prefecture reside within the Okinawa Islands, primarily on the largest island of the group, Okinawa Island.[3] Access to the various Okinawa Islands is primarily via small airports which connect to Naha Airport. Additionally, the islands are connected via ferry service to the Port of Naha in the prefectural capital.

The Okinawa Islands are within the subtropical climate zone, which supports the production of sugarcane, pineapples and cut flowers.[4] The military bases of the United States in Okinawa Prefecture are located on the Okinawa Islands. Historically the rule of the Ryukyu Kingdom, centered on Okinawa Island, consolidated the Okinawa Islands before spreading south to the Miyako and Yaeyama Islands and north to Amami Ōshima.

Yakushima Island

Yakushima Island

Yakushima’s electricity is more than 50% hydroelectric, and surplus power has been used to produce hydrogen gas in an experiment by Kagoshima University. The island has been a test site for Honda’s hydrogen fuel cell vehicle research. (There are no hydrogen cars stationed on the island but electric cars are run by the municipality.)

Yakushima has been settled since at least the Jōmon period. It was first mentioned in written documents of the Chinese Sui Dynasty of the 6th century, and in the Japanese Shoku Nihongi in an entry dated 702 CE. It formed part of ancient Tane Province. It was often mentioned in the diaries of travelers between Tang Dynasty China and Nara period Japan.

During the Edo period, Yakushima was ruled by the Shimazu clan of the Satsuma Domain and was considered part of Ōsumi Province. Following the Meiji restoration, the island has been administered as part of Kagoshima Prefecture.

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